Ladybutt (joriejc2) wrote in paragraph_a_day,
Ladybutt
joriejc2
paragraph_a_day

The start of chapter 3

Where is everybody? =/
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When the Gaians first arrived on Burwadee, the thought was that all technology, all facets of their lives, their culture, everything should move ahead as fast as possible. The first Gaians wanted to extend their explorations still further into the universe. They wanted to develop ways to help their friends and loved ones still on Earth. They, in short, wanted their presence on this new planet to be felt. As has happened throughout the annals of humanity, however, the Gaians soon got mixed up in political disputes, in their wars with the Burwadians and the continuing enslavement of the Burwadians, and in the complexities of everyday life. When the Great War started, all development suddenly came to a halt. There was a palpable need among the Gaians to recreate what their predecessors had had on Earth. Occasionally a new bunch of Earthlings would come to join the Gaian civilization, and with them they would bring books made of paper, regular soil that had been used on Earthling farms, strange things that the Gaians were desperately in need of for some reason. I have never been sure if it was the start of some sort of intergalactic homesickness or if it was about solidifying a cultural identity while making another culture subservient. I figured if the Gaians were really so homesick, they could have just traveled back home. At any rate, around the same time Burwadians were enrolled in "re-education classes." Attendance was not an option for enslaved or captive Burwadians, and if a Burwadian slave needed to stay up or awaken at torturous times to make sure the work still got done, that was no skin off the Gaians' noses. It was essential, the leaders at the time said, to make sure that the Burwadians learned about Earthling culture, history, life, everything. The Gaians convinced themselves that it would do the Burwadians good, that it would civlize them. Also, the Gaians believed that a deeper familiarity with Earthling things would aid the Burwadians in being better servants.
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